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2014 Blog Project: Week 13

May 22, 2014  •  Leave a Comment

Blog Project Week 13: Resolve

: to find an answer or solution to (something) : to settle or solve (something)

: to make a definite and serious decision to do something

: to make a formal decision about something usually by a vote

 

Several weeks behind in my blog project, I set out to find something worth the several week wait to photograph resolve. Turns out resolve is one of those words that's easy to use and understand, but not so easy to show in a creative enough way to make a photograph have an impact. A puzzle? Sure that was resolved. To make a promise? Maybe.

Then one day when life settled enough that I was able to focus on this project again I sat and thought. I thought about the many meanings this word has, how was it connected to my life? Just like all the other weeks it suddenly came to me (and this one is especially good for this week with Memorial Day on the horizon...)

1775 saw the beginning of the American Revolution -- the uprising that started a war and bore a new country. Our forefathers saw problems with the way we were being ruled by Britain and decided the best solution was to separate and take matters into our own hands. They decided, that at all costs, we would break free and live in a country base on "Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness".

My own hometown played a great role in the founding of this country. Ringwood Manor, in the north end of town, was home to many important families over the centuries. Amongst the many famous people was Robert Erskine, a cartographer for George Washington during the war. Along with being a skilled mapmaker, Erskine also designed the Marine Chevaux De Frise, spiked 12 sided iron structures that were chained across the Hudson River to prevent British ships from sailing up into New York State. Both the structures and chains used for this were made from iron forged in Ringwood. This iron, forged and designed in Ringwood, helped our founding fathers protect this great land and put a stop to British rule.

This history is all over town, most noticeably seen in the wooden replica made to 1/2 scale that stands outside our Boro Hall here

And in the old canons and chains that line the front property of Ringwood Manor.

They remind us regularly that not only was Ringwood important in the early years of our country, but how determined and strong the men (and women!) were who stood up for what they believed in. They found a solution and resolved to create a new country based on freedom.


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